Get the Facts on Raccoons and Why They Love to Move Into Your Attic

Too Adaptable

Get the Facts on Raccoons and Why They Love to Move Into Your Attic
Get the Facts on Raccoons and Why They Love to Move Into Your Attic

For raccoons, survival is dependent on adaptability. Adaptability is a great skill for raccoons to have but it spells trouble for you. The same instincts that keep raccoons seeking shelter, feeding and surviving can drive them to invade your space. In New Jersey, the only thing that should be inhabiting your attic is keepsakes, mementos, and living space, not uninvited guests. Stern Environmental’s NJ pest control aims to keep out the stowaways.

What’s in Your Attic?

Raccoons seek shelter in dry and abandoned areas. When was the last time you checked your attic? Are there any dumpsters or scraps of food near or outside your home? Raccoons love to munch on human food. They’re omnivores and love fruits, vegetables and meat. If your home has a dry and warm attic that comes with questionably edible entrees within reach, it’s like an open invitational for a raccoon! Stop the raccoon invasion! Get some great advice from an NJ pest control professional today!

The Dexterity Paws

Do you think there’s no way a raccoon can get into your house? Think again. Raccoons are professionals at getting around obstacles. They’ve been known to open doors, bottles, lift latches and to the frustration of attic owners everywhere are great climbers. Beware of tipped trash cans, tell-tale paw prints, and ruined crop gardens. A raccoon may be raiding your property! Contact Stern Environmental right away!

Our One Way Tunnels Let Raccoons Out and Not Back Into Your Attic

Our One Way Tunnels Let Raccoons Out and Not Back Into Your Attic
Our One Way Tunnels Let Raccoons Out and Not Back Into Your Attic

Wondering what to do about raccoons in the attic? Send them packing with a one-way ticket! Our NJ pest control experts have devised a one-way tunnel for raccoons that they will use to go foraging—then find out they cannot re-enter the home.

Eviction tunnels solve your raccoon problem safely and humanely:

No trapping necessary so you can avoid contact, which can spread rabies and other illnesses.

Avoids euthanasia, assuming the raccoon takes the hint and goes away.

More effective by far compared to sprays, lights, music, or other DIY raccoon removal tactics.

How Do One-Way Raccoon Tunnels Work?

Our doors are made from strong metal that even a wily raccoon cannot bend or break. A NJ pest control technician will safely install the tunnel at the raccoon’s preferred entry and exit point.

A narrow, angled opening allows the raccoon to escape at night when it wants to search for food. Raccoons will push their way out of the door, but will not be able to enter from the other direction.

Beware of DIY Raccoon Tunnels

A one-way door should only be used after consulting with a professional wildlife removal specialist. Most importantly, we need to ensure there are no baby raccoons stuck inside the attic.

Leaving babies behind will lead to foul odors, especially if one dies in the nest. You also want professional cleaning to remove urine and feces, which may contain roundworm.

If getting rid of raccoons in the attic is your objective, nothing beats a one-way tunnel. Contact us for NJ pest control and raccoon removal by knowledgeable, experienced professionals!

What Restaurants and Businesses Need to Know About Wasps and Premise Liability

What Restaurants and Businesses Need to Know About Wasps and Premise Liability
What Restaurants and Businesses Need to Know About Wasps and Premise Liability

The word “liability” can strike fear in the most seasoned of restaurant or business owners. Sometimes invasive species can bring liability to your door. Normally minor painful stings from bees or wasps can turn deadly when a person is allergic to them. Are stinging insects becoming a nuisance in your establishment? Hiring the Stern Environmental NJ pest control team makes the best sense!

Protect Your Business and Your Customers

Hundreds of thousands of people are sent to the hospital each year due to bee stings. Imagine the potential for liability from customers who may encounter life-threatening scenarios at your storefront because of pest infestations.

When the seasons change from summer to fall, bees become increasingly aggressive. They’re on a mission to forage for food to stock up for their queens and the encroaching chill. Swarms of stinging insects are frightening to experience, especially for vulnerable customers who may just be at the wrong place at the wrong time.

When you enlist the help of your friendly NJ pest control professionals, you’re reducing the threat of liability payments, lawsuits, and hospital visits.

Stern Environmental Keeps Your Interests in Mind

Contact Stern Environmental’s NJ pest control team today to keep bees away and business booming. Don’t be liable for some aggressive insects stinging your bottom line. Your business should run smoothly, without the threat of unpredictable liabilities.

Rats Are Getting Fat in NYC What Are You Doing to Put Them on a Diet?

Incredible? Canadian SPCA Matches Stray Cats with Farms for Rodent Control
Do Your Part to Control Rats

It’s not news rats are taking over NYC. But what may surprise you is that the city is not alone. In many cities, rodents have gotten so rotund due to easy access to food they could use a spring diet. It’s no tall tale, some have packed on so many pounds they’re getting stuck in inconvenient places. And the NJ pest control pros at Stern Environmental just have to share this latest, highly-amusing, rat-related news release with you.

Fat Rat Stuck in Sewer Grate Rescued by Firefighters

It’s okay. We know you want to read it again, and you’re relieved even rodents have a problem with holiday fluff. The rat in question, a stout female, had apparently packed on quite a bit of winter flab. She ended up stuck in a manhole grate in the city of Bensheim, Germany. 

Goodbye Skinny Jeans

A large-scale rat rescue operation ensued, involving a rescue attempt by a large-scale, professional animal rescue operation. When this failed, an entire team of firefighters attempted to eject the plump pest. Stuck at the hip, she could not be moved forward or backward. Seven firefighters had to pop the manhole cover to finally lasso her out and let her loose back into Bensheim’s sewer system.

Rats taking over? End the all-you-can-eat buffet.  Contact the NJ pest control team at Stern Environmental today.

The Yellow Jacket – a Social and Predatory Wasp

What to Know About Hornet Attacks
What to Know About Yellow Jackets

Commonly confused for bees, hornets, and paper wasps, yellow jackets are easily distinguishable from other pests with careful observation. The NJ pest control experts at Stern want to help you identify these aggressive pests, which are capable of repeatedly stinging. 

Is it a Wasp or a Bee?

Most yellow jackets are ½-inch long, though queens can be larger. Some species are black and yellow, some yellow and blackish-red, and a few black and white. Unlike bees, they do NOT have fuzzy bodies or hairy hind legs and do NOT carry pollen, however they’re important predators of other pest insects. They live in colonies and can be best identified by fast, side-to-side movement prior to landing. Female wasps can sting repeatedly with barbed, lance-like stingers, injecting venom that can cause an allergic reaction to susceptible individuals and those repeatedly stung. 

Where are They Hiding?

Yellow jackets can build nests nearly anywhere: The ground, inside trees and bushes, stumps, and manmade structures (homes, cars). Nests are constructed from wood fibers chewed to a pulp. Colonies die annually, except overwintering queens bearing young, which hideout under leaves and bark, in stumps, and the ground. Each queen can expand a colony to 4,000-5,000 female workers and a nest of 10,000-15,000 cells of new males and queens. 

Don’t let history repeat itself. Rid your yard of wasps with the help of the NJ pest control pros at Stern Environmental today.

Serving Up News on Bugs that Bug You!