The University of Connecticut on Bee and Wasp Abatement – What to Know

The University of Connecticut on Bee and Wasp Abatement - What to Know
The University of Connecticut on Bee and Wasp Abatement – What to Know

Bees and wasps are valuable members of the food chain, but that doesn’t make them welcome house guests. The University of Connecticut shares helpful information about bee and wasp abatement.

Bee and Wasp Behavior

• Generally, bees and wasps won’t sting unless they detect a threat to themselves or their nests. Leave hives undisturbed unless they’re in close proximity to humans, such as near a building entrance.

• Yellow jackets, hornets and paper wasps don’t reuse nests from one year to the next. If it’s fall and the nest is in an isolated part of the property, leaving it there may be the safest course of action.

• Commercial sprays can be applied directly to the opening of a nest. Infestations inside the home may call for use of an insect bomb.

• Attic grates, vents and other small openings should be screened over or caulked to prevent bees and wasps from entering.

Treating Bee and Wasp Stings

• If the stinger is still embedded in the flesh, use a fingernail or piece of plastic to gently scrape it out.

• Apply a damp paste of table salt or baking soda to the wound and let it sit for 30 minutes.

• If the sting victim has a history of allergies, contact a doctor immediately.

Choose Stern Environmental Group for Effective Bee and Wasp Abatement

Our bee and wasp abatement services include round-the-clock emergency hive removal. Contact us for more information.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *