Tag Archives: Bed Bug Resources

Bed Bugs: What You Really Need to Know Part One

Knowing How to Fortify Yourself and Your Home Against Bed Bugs Is Key.
Knowing How to Fortify Yourself and Your Home Against Bed Bugs Is Key.

Bed bugs; you can’t live with them and unfortunately due to their mobility, the days of living without them are becoming few and far between. One reason is the increase in international travel that allows these blood-sucking bugs to easily move from continent to continent.

About Bed Bugs

Cimex lectularius is the most common of the bed bug species. Regions with temperate climates such as Europe, North America, and Central Asia are popular habitats for these bugs. The C. hemipterus is found mostly in tropical regions such as California.

For many years, it was assumed bed bug infestations were due to unclean areas, dilapidated houses, and crowded living conditions. That is not necessarily the case any more as they have been found in five-star hotels, resorts, airplanes, commuter trains, buses, schools, hospitals, and nursing homes, to name just a few.

In the past, pesticides were used to control infestations, but through the years, bed bugs have built up a resistance to many treatment solutions. Today, NJ bed bug specialists rely on more sophisticated bed bug equipment and treatments to eliminate the initial infestation and provide ways to prevent them from returning.

To get the best help from professional NJ bed bug specialists, contact the Stern Environmental Group. Our technicians are experienced in finding the source of the bed bug infestation and ridding your home of these problematic bugs. Call today to schedule a home inspection.

 

The Bed Bug Life Cycle – Know Your Enemy

Understanding Bed Bug Life Cycles are Important.
Understanding Bed Bug Life Cycles are Important.

Bed bugs can quickly become a major nuisance when they get into your residential or commercial building. How long do these pests live? Learn more about their life cycle and when to seek help from NJ bed bug specialists.

Bed Bug Eggs and Nymphs

Females can lay up to 500 eggs during their lifespan, which generally means laying up to five eggs a day. Bed bug eggs, which are white, are usually found on wood and other rougher surfaces. These eggs are coated with a sticky, material and typically hatch in 10 to 15 days.

When bed bugs are going through the nymph stages, they look for blood meals, which are needed in for them to grow and develop. After passing through five of these stages, they become adults.

Adult Bed Bugs

Bed bugs have a life cycle that can range from as little as five weeks to as long as four months. Their lifespan depends on how much food is available and what the temperature in their environment is. Keep in mind that these pests can go up to 400 days without feeding if they’re in the right conditions. This usually means being in an environment that offers certain temperatures and humidity levels suitable for them.

If your home or business needs NJ bed bug specialists, we’re here to help. Contact Stern Environmental Group for more information about our services.

Sleep Tight and Don’t Let the Bed Bugs Bite!

When You Need Help Call the Bed Bug Specialists - Stern Environmental Group!
When You Need Help Call the Bed Bug Specialists – Stern Environmental Group!

Many people grew up hearing the rhyme ‘Good night, sleep tight, don’t let the bed bugs bite’ and most likely didn’t give much thought to its origins. Parents and children probably didn’t think about the real possibility of biting bed bugs, either, since the use of pesticides and DDT in the 20th century nearly eradicated the pests from existence.

Today, with the influx of travelers making their way to destinations across the globe, bed bugs have resurfaced with a vengeance. So, before sharing the rhyme with friends or family, you might want to think twice as some may have real life experience of not sleeping tight while the bed bugs took bite after bite.

Rhyme History

There are numerous theories about the origins of the rhyme but historians aren’t convinced the suggested reasons for the rhyme are anything more than guesswork.

The Oxford English Dictionary explains that “sleep tight” means to sleep soundly and doesn’t mention bed bugs.

Although the earliest the bed bug phrase was cited was in the late 19th century, earlier citations don’t mention the word “bug”. Other words used include fleas, buggers, and mosquitoes.

At Stern we have everything needed to guarantee a bed bug free home including expert NJ bed bug exterminators. When you have a pest problem, contact us to schedule an inspection with one of our NJ bed bug exterminator professionals so you can sleep tight every night.

University of Minnesota Creates a Retailers Guide to Fight Bed Bugs

Retailer's Guide to Bed Bugs
Retailer’s Guide to Bed Bugs

At Stern’s NYC pest control, we always want to stay one step ahead of bed bugs, and any way that we can help consumers or retailers is a bonus.

To that end, the University of Minnesota has created a retailers guide that gives solid and useful information about fighting bed bugs, and it’s a “must read” for those in the hotel business, hospitals, office buildings, movie theaters and virtually any other place where large numbers of people gather or congregate in a residential or commercial setting.

Here is a basic overview of the article:

Let’s Beat the Bed Bug

• A general history of bed bug infestations and where these pests can be found in both residential and retail establishments.

• An explanation of how bed bugs actually get into a retail store setting.

• Places in retail stores where they are most often found, highlighting both lower risk areas and higher risk areas.

• Prevention and control methods which address clutter, product returns, and what employees and managers need to know if there are bed bug complaints. This section also addresses basic bed bug control and having a pest control company summoned if bed bugs are found.

If you have any questions about bed bugs for your retail business or your residence, please contact us at Stern Environmental Group. We are bed bug experts and have been serving the NYC and New Jersey areas for nearly 20 years.

Is More Research Needed To Control Bed Bugs?

It’s been over ten years since bed bugs began nibbling their way once again from sea to shining sea in the United States.  Today, April 26, 2013 marks the end of Bed Bug Awareness Week.  Where exactly are we at in the fight against bed bugs?

Some states have taken the bull by the horns and have developed laws that spell out the exact responsibilities that landlords and tenants must follow when bed bugs are present in a home.  Some states, such as New York, have seen their bed bug population drop tremendously.  Some states, such as Illinois and Ohio, have seen their bed bug population increase tremendously.

Many strains of bed bugs have proven to be resistant to pesticides that are currently available.  Keep in mind that many pesticides that are currently used for bed bugs and other insects have been re-purposed from pesticides that were once developed for agricultural use.  Despite the widespread availability, store bought bed bug pesticide products have proven to be completely ineffective against killing bed bugs.

Bed bugs are known to carry approximately 50 pathogens on their body.  The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) state that bed bugs are a public health concern, but they remain steadfast that bed bugs do not transmit any diseases to humans.

According to Infection Control Today on April 25, 2013, an interesting study was done by scientists at the University of Cincinnati.  There, the DNA of bed bugs in the Cincinnati area were collected and examined from various residences. The scientists are hoping that their findings about the bacteria that were found on the bed bugs will help to develop pesticides that will one day kill the bloodsuckers.

Entomologists across the United States want more funding for bed bug research, but the reality is that funding will likely still be limited until bed bugs are considered to be more than just a nuisance pest.