Tag Archives: NJ Wasp Removal

EPA Recommended Integrated Pest Management Tactics for Bee and Wasp Abatement

EPA Recommended Integrated Pest Management Tactics for Bee and Wasp Abatement
EPA Recommended Integrated Pest Management Tactics for Bee and Wasp Abatement

With summer heat comes the inevitable arrival of buzzy pests. Bees and wasps, feared for their stings but relied upon for their pollinating capabilities, take over yards nationwide. How can you reduce the number of these pests in your yard to tolerable levels? With these bee and wasp abatement strategies from the Environmental Protection Agency.

Integrated Pest Management Tactics for Controlling Bees & Wasps

• Put food away immediately after mealtime. 

• Clean up spills of sticky, syrupy liquids and foods immediately.

• Keep trash cans and dumpsters tightly sealed, emptying them frequently.

• Eliminate standing water, which draws pests of all kinds, fixing leaky faucets and areas with poor drainage so that they remain dry.

• Plug holes in your building structure that could allow pests entry.

• Ensure the structural integrity of vents, and window screens. Preventing bees and wasps from entering your building is the best defense.

Other Tips for Reducing the Population of Bees & Wasps on Your Premises

• Consider composting indoors, as these pests can be drawn to open compost piles.

• Clean up rotten fruit and vegetables in the garden to avoid attracting pests.

• Don’t swat wasps. They release chemicals when squashed that can incite nearby wasps to attack. Learn what to do in the vicinity of wasps.

Integrated pest management strategies for bee and wasp abatement falling short? Alleviate the sting of infestations with the help of Stern Environmental today.

The University of Connecticut on Bee and Wasp Abatement – What to Know

The University of Connecticut on Bee and Wasp Abatement - What to Know
The University of Connecticut on Bee and Wasp Abatement – What to Know

Bees and wasps are valuable members of the food chain, but that doesn’t make them welcome house guests. The University of Connecticut shares helpful information about bee and wasp abatement.

Bee and Wasp Behavior

• Generally, bees and wasps won’t sting unless they detect a threat to themselves or their nests. Leave hives undisturbed unless they’re in close proximity to humans, such as near a building entrance.

• Yellow jackets, hornets and paper wasps don’t reuse nests from one year to the next. If it’s fall and the nest is in an isolated part of the property, leaving it there may be the safest course of action.

• Commercial sprays can be applied directly to the opening of a nest. Infestations inside the home may call for use of an insect bomb.

• Attic grates, vents and other small openings should be screened over or caulked to prevent bees and wasps from entering.

Treating Bee and Wasp Stings

• If the stinger is still embedded in the flesh, use a fingernail or piece of plastic to gently scrape it out.

• Apply a damp paste of table salt or baking soda to the wound and let it sit for 30 minutes.

• If the sting victim has a history of allergies, contact a doctor immediately.

Choose Stern Environmental Group for Effective Bee and Wasp Abatement

Our bee and wasp abatement services include round-the-clock emergency hive removal. Contact us for more information.

The Yellow Jacket – a Social and Predatory Wasp

What to Know About Hornet Attacks
What to Know About Yellow Jackets

Commonly confused for bees, hornets, and paper wasps, yellow jackets are easily distinguishable from other pests with careful observation. The NJ pest control experts at Stern want to help you identify these aggressive pests, which are capable of repeatedly stinging. 

Is it a Wasp or a Bee?

Most yellow jackets are ½-inch long, though queens can be larger. Some species are black and yellow, some yellow and blackish-red, and a few black and white. Unlike bees, they do NOT have fuzzy bodies or hairy hind legs and do NOT carry pollen, however they’re important predators of other pest insects. They live in colonies and can be best identified by fast, side-to-side movement prior to landing. Female wasps can sting repeatedly with barbed, lance-like stingers, injecting venom that can cause an allergic reaction to susceptible individuals and those repeatedly stung. 

Where are They Hiding?

Yellow jackets can build nests nearly anywhere: The ground, inside trees and bushes, stumps, and manmade structures (homes, cars). Nests are constructed from wood fibers chewed to a pulp. Colonies die annually, except overwintering queens bearing young, which hideout under leaves and bark, in stumps, and the ground. Each queen can expand a colony to 4,000-5,000 female workers and a nest of 10,000-15,000 cells of new males and queens. 

Don’t let history repeat itself. Rid your yard of wasps with the help of the NJ pest control pros at Stern Environmental today.